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Analysis of Jumping Videos

You can have your high jumping analyzed using your own home videos for just $15
Just go to the Purchase page, pay for the analysis using your credit card, and I will send you instructions on how to deliver the videos. Your credit card will only be charged after the analysis is completed and delivered to you.


Camerawork For Best Results

Optimum Camera Angles:

Please try to provide videos using the camera angles described below. Although I can use existing video footage from meets and practices, the camera angles may not be optimum for isolating problems in the jump.


Figure 1: Preferred camera angles for video analysis.  The most important views are camera angles A and B. Include camera angle C if possible. Camera angle D can replace camera angle B if it is impossible to place a camera at position B. Camera angle D is especially helpful if there are issues with knee drive and spin about the vertical axis.

Camera angle A - Looking straight down the line of flight. The takeoff point should be directly below the center of the bar in the camera's viewfinder.

Camera angle B - Looking straight along the bar. The camera should be at the height of the bar and just enough off the center line of the bar so the full length of the bar can be seen.

Camera angle C - Looking at the center of the bar.
If possible, the video should be taken from a slightly elevated platform (e.g., jump box or small step ladder) for optimal viewing of approach footprints and approach path markings..

Camera angle D - Looking straight down the line of flight. The takeoff point should be directly below the center of the bar in the camera's viewfinder. It may be necessary to place a stick vertically on the takeoff point to get the alignment correct.

Field Of View:

In all videos it is best to see the jumper throughout the takeoff, flight, and landing. Camera angles B and D should also show the jumper entering the curve. If possible, use a tripod or some other fixed object to steady the camera.
 

This jumper came out of the curve early so he wasn't leaned away from the bar at plant.
The result: a dive with resulting loss of height and inadequate rotation about the bar.

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